On-line Customers

The location of on-line shippers and the number of carloads shipped each year was contained in Lehigh Valley Railroad Traffic Track Diagrams issued for the Board of Directors’ trips over the railroad.

These reports were prepared by the various LVRR Sales Territories, and simply stapled together for the Board’s trip, so the formats and the details of the information presented vary somewhat from territory to territory, and none of them used the same format as the “List of Stations, Distances, Interlockings, Sidings, etc” in the Employee Timetable. I’ve tried to work through the differences in style and present a uniform format as much as possible, but there may be some misinterpretations. In my first cut at this, I’ve used Employee Timetables No. 7 (Oct. 1959), No. 9 (Oct. 1968) and No. 10 (Aug. 1975) for the Stations and their mileages. Information found only in the Traffic Track Diagrams was fitted in as seemed to make sense – often they rounded off the mileages, or left them out completely. In some cases, it was hard to see how the locations given in the traffic track diagrams fit with the stations from the employee timetables. I’ve marked these inĀ red. Comments and corrections are welcome!

Branch lines and alternate trackage are shown on separate pages, and are hyperlinked to the mainline charts wherever the connection to the mainline was specified – not always the case, so again, your help will be appreciated!

New York Division Main Line

New York Division Branch Lines

L&S Area – Main Line & Mountain Cut-Off

L&S Area – Allentown Terminal Railroad – R Tower to Burn

Buffalo DivisionĀ Main Line

Buffalo Division Branch Lines

 

Sources:
1971 & 1972 Traffic Track Diagrams – Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission
1973 Traffic Track Diagram – Ralph DeBlasi
Employee Timetable No. 7, 10/25/1959 – Steve Bakos
Employee Timetable No. 9, 10/27/1968 – Ed Schaller
Employee Timetable No. 10, 8/10/1975 – Ed Schaller
MapQuest shows the LVRR trackage, if you zoom in far enough, and has links to corresponding aerial photos, which although taken long after the track was torn up, still show the right of way in many cases. Here is the link for Coxton Yard.

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